Comparing DNA Results

Her National Geographic DNA results are finally in!

She is 1.5% Neanderthal.  This was one of the aspects we were most curious about.  He is also 1.5% so we are a happy “slightly more Neanderthal than average” household.

john-neaderthal

Below is a chart showing how the DNA results look when compared to each other.  We submitted our saliva samples to Ancestry.com and National Geographic.  We also submitted our Ancestry.com data to DNA.land (they use the data to determine your information based on their logarithm)

The only constant is that I am of 100% European descent.  This is supported by family history data collected and visual appearance.  No surprise here!  The DNA.land graphic below shows the Ambiguous category as greenish.

If you consider where they are making the distinction between categories, I have similar results across the board.  I am mostly Northern European with a smattering of Southern European thrown in.

My maternal grandfather was supposedly of Polish descent so I should be about 25% Eastern European.  The DNA results all have at least 25% for the category which would include this area of Europe.  My paternal grandmother’s parents were from Sweden and Norway.  I should have about 25% Scandinavia.  Again, depending on how you divide the categories, I have about this percent for these.

The only surprise is the Jewish and Ambiguous categories.  Ambiguous I get – they can’t narrow it down based on the data they use.  Makes sense.  Jewish ranges from 0% with Ancestry.com to 1.3% using DNA.land to 5% using National Geographic.  Overall, not much input.  Since we know so little about my maternal grandfather, we assumed this category would be higher – we figured he was hiding something.  He claimed to be of Polish descent so we thought it might be that he was Jewish.  Nope, just a philanderer.