Saturday Genealogy Fun – Birth Day Edition

Finally getting caught up on some “old” Saturday Night Genealogy Fun Posts!  Thank you Genea-Musings for the great ideas!!   My answers are in RED below!

My tree has 20,078 people.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun — Who in Your Database Has Your Birth Day?

Hey genea-folks, it’s Saturday Night again,  time for more Genealogy Fun!
Your mission this week, should you decide to accept it, is to:

1) Are there persons in your genealogy database that has the same exact birth date that you do?  If so, tell us about him or her – what do you know, and how is s/he related to you?  No one has my exact birth date (Nov. 11, 19xx)

2)  Are there persons in your database that are your ancestors that share your birth day (but not the year)?   How many, and who are they?  I have one direct ancestor with the same birth date – my great-great-grandfather Adam Alexander Fetherkile.  He was born Nov. 11, 1852 and died Dec. 22, 1937.

3)  Are there other persons in your database that share your birth day (but not the year)?  How many, and who are they?  Including myself and Grandpa, there are 37 people with the birth date Nov. 11.  26 are relatives by blood and 10 are “unrelated”. For the sake of privacy, names of the living are not included.

Capture

4)  For bonus points, how did you determine this?  What feature or process did you use in your software to work this problem out?  I think the Calendar feature probably does it, but perhaps you have a trick to make this work outside of the Calendar function.  I use Family Tree Maker 2014.1  

Here are the steps:  open tree; click Publish; click Person Reports; click List of Individuals Report; click Create Report;  when the next screen shows up, click sort by month/date (which automatically defaults to birthdate) and be sure that “all individuals”;  click generate report again;  scroll to the desired date.

 

US Presidents – How Many in a Lifetime??

Idea for this post courtesy of GeneaMusings Saturday Night Genealogy Fun.

“This week’s Genealogy Fun challenge is very timely since a new president was inaugurated yesterday. Here are the answers to the question – how many presidents have served during my lifetime, my parents and grandparents and how many generations back do I have to go to cover all 45 U.S. presidents?”

I put my data into a spreadsheet to answer the questions.  See spreadsheet below.

Her Lifetime: 11 (since Kennedy)                        His Lifetime: 12 (since Eisenhower)

Mom and Dad: 14 (since FD Roosevelt)                      Mom: 15 (since Hoover)
Dad: 14 (Hoover – Obama)

Grandparents: 13 (Taft – Carter)                                  Grandparents: 17 (Harrison-Carter)
14 (Wilson – GHW Bush)                                                15 (Cleveland-Ford)
11  (Taft – Nixon)                                                             11 (T Roosevelt-L Johnson)
17  (T Roosevelt – Clinton)                                             16 (Taft – Clinton)

 

Great-Grandparents: Range from 9 – 19 Presidents          and         12-18 Presidents

2x Great-Grandparents: Range from 14 – 21 Presidents    and        17-22 Presidents

3x Great-Grandparents: Range from 13 – 25 Presidents     and       8-24 Presidents

4x Great-Grandparents: Range from 8 – 21 Presidents      and        8-18 Presidents

This is the first generation to reach Washington for both of us.  She has 15 ancestors who were alive during Washington’s Presidency and He has 4!)

GP = Grandfather   GM = Grandmother    Number indicates how many greats.  Letters after indicate first letter of last name, in order of my Ahnentafel Report generated by Family Tree Maker.  I only included ancestors who lived part/all of their life in the US and I had dates of birth and death.  If it was a transition year, I used birth, death, inaugurations dates to determine if they lived during a particular President’s term.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surname Counts – Genealogy Fun

I am joining all the others out there who are doing the Genea-Musings Saturday Night Genealogy Fun.

I used Family Tree Maker 2014 to create this report.  To do so, you would click on Publish – Person Reports – Surname Report.  Sort by Surname Count.  Be sure to include all individuals!

My tree has 4637 individuals.  There are 44 names on each page of the report and this report was 23+ pages in length (I calculate a little over 1000 surnames)  Here’s my first page.

 

Surname Report

Fetherkile and Featherkile are of the same family.  Their total count would be 91 placing them in the 7th position.  Squires and Squire are also the same family line.  Their total count would be 80 and 8th position.

It doesn’t look like I have any Seavers.

 

 

His Numbers – 6.8% at 10 Generations

Genea-Musings has a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun challenge every week.  This week it is to determine how “complete” your tree is.  Last night I did Her Numbers so I figured I would do His Numbers.  His Ancestral Score is 6.8% meaning I’ve found only 6.8% of his 1023 ancestors for 10 generations.

Below is the spreadsheet for His Numbers.  I used FTM14 to generate the Ahnentafel Report for 21 generations and counted the old fashioned way (by hand) how many I’ve found for each generation.  If any information has been collected on an individual, they are included in the count.  His Numbers were much easier to count!

I calculated both the percent of the identified possible for each generation as well as the percent of the total possible for each generation.

Looks like a lot more work is needed!! 

 

Her Numbers – 18.18% at 10 Generations

Genea-Musings has a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun challenge every week.  This week it is to determine how “complete” your tree is.

Well, here are the numbers for Her!  I used FTM14 to generate the Ahnentafel Report for 21 generations and counted the old fashioned way (by hand) how many I’ve found for each generation.  If any information has been collected on an individual, they are included in the count.

Her Ancestral Score is 18.18% at 10 Generations.

I calculated both the percent of the identified possible for each generation as well as the percent of the total possible for each generation.

Looks like a lot more work is needed!!